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Introduction

There is a wealth of information hidden in the contents and the markup of a web page that can be extremely useful when trying to understand what a page is all about while trawling the web. One classic example would be tags: those short phrases or keywords that bloggers and publishers use to describe what a webpage, article or blog post is about. Tags can be rendered as visual elements on the page, or hidden away using `meta` attributes.

Screen Shot 2017-02-21 at 18.34.59

example of meta attributes

It is obvious that by extracting these tags we can learn a whole lot about any blog post or article that we are analyzing. They describe a piece of content the way their author or editor would, and they may contain various pieces of information such as the high-level topical category, the entities (people, places, organizations, etc.) mentioned, or the concepts that the article is about. This makes them an excellent source of information to leverage when classifying web pages.

The problem with extracting these tags is the way webpages are structured on the web, and the way they are expressed differs greatly across web pages and sites. Different Content Management Systems used by different blogs and news websites each have their own way of presenting metadata such as tags, making it difficult to access and parse this information.

tags dark grey (3)

examples of visual tags from various blogging platforms

Today we are announcing the launch of a much-requested addition to our Article Extraction API that provides a uniform and standard interface for extracting tags from any blog post or article on the web.

Tag Extraction

We’ve supercharged our article extraction feature in the Text Analysis API to make it even easier to extract useful information from a webpage. Through our Article Extraction endpoint, users already have the ability to extract metadata such as author name, publish date, main image, article title and the main body of text from a page. But in a lot of cases, a web page will contain other useful information about that page often in the form of tags..

The Tag Extraction feature will identify and extract any relevant tags present on the page no matter the structure of the page or where the tags are present.

So how can these tags be used?

These extracted tags can be utilized in a number of ways;

To tag or classify a web page

The tags extracted can often give a very useful insight into what a page is about. These tags are often manually added by the author, an editor or the web designer meaning they can provide very accurate descriptions of what a page is about.

Take for example these tags extracted from an article on Artificial Intelligence on Wired below.

{
author :  Cade Metz,
image :  https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/GettyImages-135579222_HP-1200x630-e1485911637921.jpg,
tags : [
neural networks,
artificial-intelligence,
neural-networks,
singularity,
Singularity,
Artificial Intelligence
],
article :  For almost three weeks, Dong Kim sat at a casino in Pittsburgh and played poker against a machine. But Kim wasn’t just a...,
videos : [ ... ],
title :  Inside the Poker AI That Out-Bluffed the Best Humans,
publishDate :  2017-02-01T07:00:43+00:00,
feeds : [ ... ]
}

Classify a page according to a taxonomy

So while these extracted tags can be useful in understanding a webpage they don’t necessarily help if your aim is to classify content based on a particular taxonomy.

The tags can also be used to classify a piece of content or a page into predetermined categories according to a particular taxonomy. For example using our classification by taxonomy features, these tags provide users with the ability to categorize content efficiently.

Example:
First we extract the tags from an Irish times article on Conor McGregor

{
author :  Emmet Malone,
image :  http://www.irishtimes.com/image-creator/?id=1.2620063&origw=1440,
tags : [
UFC,
Other Sports,
Nate Diaz,
Other,
Dana White,
Sport,
Conor Mcgregor
],
article :  When this imbroglio finally blows over, we can explore what Conor McGregor has against Connecticut. For now, let’s conce...,
videos : [ ... ],
title :  Conor McGregor lays cards on table in poker game with UFC,
publishDate :  2016-04-21T22:48:00+00:00,
feeds : [ ... ]
}

You’ll see the tags present in the results above.

Next, we use our Classification by Taxonomy feature to automatically categorize the content. You’ll see from the results below that it is correctly categorized as Sports and Martial Arts.

{
text :  UFC, Other Sports, Nate Diaz, Other, Dana White, Sport, Conor Mcgregor,
taxonomy :  iab-qag,
language :  en,
categories : [
{
confident :  true,
score :  0.22010621132863611,
label :  Sports,
links : [ ... ],
id :  IAB17
},
{
confident :  true,
score :  0.11470804569304427,
label :  Martial Arts,
links : [ ... ],
id :  IAB17-20
}

Classifying text-light web pages

In most NLP driven page classification problems you rely heavily on the main body of text present on a page to give context and understanding. However, in some cases, web pages may contain little or no text which make it harder to classify or categorize. Common examples include pages that contain only a video, or a collection of photos or product style pages like the one below.

Screen Shot 2017-02-21 at 15.51.58

an example of a product page that is very light on text

As an example, let’s take the page above, it’s a product page taken from the Best Buy website. What you’ll notice is, there’s very little text on the page to use for an appropriate analysis target apart from a few headings. On top of that there are also lot’s of other elements like ads and buttons on the page which make it even harder to scrape. Now just imagine how different every product page is, it’s almost impossible to build an efficient script or bot that’s going to classify these pages successfully.

Using the Tag Extraction feature however means you can leverage other elements of the page as previously explained and shown in the results below. As you can see from the JSON results, the listed tags are very precise, and do an excellent job of describing the page in question.

{
author :  ,
image :  http://www.bestbuy.cahttps://multimedia.bbycastatic.ca/multimedia/products/100x100/104/10423/10423406.jpg,
tags : [
Smart Lights,
Switches & Plugs,
Smart Home,
Home Living,
Best Buy Canada,
Smart Lighting
],
article :  The Hue Phoenix rises to the occasion when you want to create ambience and mood lighting. Using the Philips Hue app, you...,
videos : [ ... ],
title :  Philips Hue Phoenix Table Lamp - Opal White,
publishDate :  ,
feeds : [ ... ]
}

Conclusion

Whatever your reason is for understanding web pages at scale, this new feature provides you with a fantastic opportunity to dive even deeper into the web content they analyze and analyze and classify a wider variety of web pages.

Want to try it for yourself? Click the image below to sign-up to get Free access and 1,000 calls per day with our Text Analysis API.





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Introduction

Last week we showed you how we analyzed 2.2 million tweets associated with Super Bowl 51 to gauge the public’s reaction to the event. While the Atlanta Falcons and New England Patriots waged war on the field, a battle of ever-increasing popularity and importance was taking place off it. We are of course referring to the Super Bowl ads battle, where some of biggest brands on Earth pay top dollar for a 30-second slot during one of sport’s greatest spectacles.

With roughly 35% of the US population tuning in to watch this year’s Super Bowl, it’s easy to see why brands pay what they do to be involved, which is in the region of $5 million for 30 seconds of airtime. Breaking it down, that’s over $166,000 per second!

So after analyzing how Twitter reacted to the game itself, we wanted to once again dive into the much anticipated and scrutinized battle of the brands, this time by looking at both Twitter’s reaction as well online news content.

Our Process

In particular, we were interested in uncovering and investigating the following key areas:

  • Volume of tweets before, during and after the game
  • Sentiment of tweets before, during and after the game
  • Brand-specific public reactions
  • Brand-specific tweet volumes
  • Reaction from online news
  • Most mentioned brands and individuals in online news

To do so, we looked at both Twitter and the news.

Twitter

We used the Twitter Streaming API to collect a total of around 2.2 million tweets that mentioned a selection of game and team-related keywords, hashtags and handles. Using the AYLIEN Text Analysis API, we then analyzed each of these tweets and visualized our results using Tableau.

News

To analyze the reaction in online news content, we performed specific search queries using the AYLIEN News API, again using Tableau to visualize.

Our Predictions

Prior to the Super Bowl, we looked at and analyzed brand mention volumes in online news in an attempt to predict how the public would react to their ads when they aired during the game.

From our analysis, we selected our top 3 Super Bowl ads to watch out for and made predictions for each. We’ll expand on each prediction below and also look at the performance of some other interesting brands. Here are the brands we analyzed;

  • Pepsi
  • Budweiser
  • Avocados from Mexico
  • Intel
  • KFC
  • Snickers
  • T-Mobile
  • KIA

You can also check out the original blog post here: Using NLP & media monitoring to predict the winners and losers of the Super Bowl 51 ads battle.

So without further ado, let’s see how we did!

Tweet volumes by brand

To begin, we wanted to see which brands performed best in terms of tweet mentions. How many tweets contained a mention of each brand?

The chart below shows how brand-related chatter on Twitter developed before, during and after the game.

Straight away we can see that two brands in particular considerably outperformed the rest when it came to spikes in mention volumes; Pepsi and Avocados from Mexico.

These two brands along with Budweiser make up our top 3, with the others really failing to make much of an impact in comparison.

Perhaps the most interesting observation from this chart is the double volume spike for Pepsi, which came pre-game and mid-game. Let’s take a look the reason behind this;

Pepsi

Our pre-game predictions

  • Huge Twitter mention volumes for Pepsi, owing to Lady Gaga’s performance.
  • Low mention volumes for LIFEWTR and Pepsi Zero Sugar.
  • Tame public reaction to LIFEWTR commercial and very low YouTube views.

Analysis

In terms of tweet mention volume, Pepsi was a clear overall winner. The beverage giant focused their efforts on generating awareness around two new products; LIFEWTR and Pepsi Zero Sugar. LIFEWTR was given it’s own commercial in the first quarter, while Zero Sugar sponsored the halftime show.

Judging by the sheer volume of tweet chatter around Pepsi, you might assume that their ad and new products have been well received by the viewing public. However, as we predicted prior to the game, Pepsi’s high mentions volume was mostly down to the fact that they sponsored the halftime show, that starred Lady Gaga. The two spikes visible in the chart below actually have very little to do with either product. Rather, they represent 1) a barrage pre-game good luck Gaga tweets and 2) Twitter’s reaction to the singer’s halftime show performance.

Sentiment analysis of Pepsi tweets

The chart below shows volumes of positive and negative tweets before, during and after the game. It should be noted that the majority of tweets collected have neutral sentiment, and offer no opinion either way. We therefore exclude tweets with neutral sentiment.

Less than 5% of tweets mentioning Pepsi also included mentions of LIFEWTR or Zero Sugar, such was the dominance of Lady Gaga on Twitter. While Pepsi had a strong brand presence throughout the event, they perhaps failed to highlight their two new products. The chart below compares mentions of Pepsi and Lady Gaga, with an obvious winner;

Further evidence of Pepsi’s apparent failure to highlight their new products comes from the LIFEWTR ad performance on YouTube, which currently has 1.2 million views. When compared to the likes of KIA and Mr. Clean whose ads have 21.6 and 14.5 million views respectively, you can see how little of an impact the commercial had on viewers.

Watch: Pepsi’s Super Bowl ad for LIFEWTR

Budweiser

Our pre-game predictions

  • Most controversial ad this year
  • Ad content will be irrelevant, and a political debate will rage on Twitter

Analysis

Budweiser’s Super Bowl ad, titled Born The Hard Way, depicts Adolphus Busch, the co-founder of Anheuser-Busch, arriving in the US from Germany with a dream of opening his own beer brewery. With the immigrant-theme and opening line “You don’t look like you’re from around here”, the ad unintentionally fuelled a political debate online as Trump supporters saw it as a clear dig at the President’s planned travel ban, while Trump opposers saw it as political statement and celebration of immigrant history in the US.

Sentiment analysis of Budweiser tweets

The high volumes of both positive and negative tweets certainly backs up our prediction of Budweiser airing the most controversial ad of Super Bowl 51. While positive sentiment outweighed negative throughout the event, it is clear to see there was a strong split in opinion here.
As expected, the ad itself was minimally discussed on Twitter. Rather, it was seen as a political statement and one that many felt they needed to be either for or against. On one side of the fence, we had tweeters threatening to never buy Budweiser products again and using #boycottbudweiser in their tweets.



On the other side, we had people declaring their love for the brand, and encouraging others to go out and buy the beer!



Although Budweiser claim the ad was shot in Summer of 2016, long before the current controversy around Trump’s travel ban came to the fore, we are left to wonder whether their timing was mere coincidence or a well planned publicity stunt.

Watch: Budweiser’s Super Bowl ad “Born The Hard Way”

Snickers

Our pre-game predictions

  • Live format will inspire and drive high social engagement.
  • A popular cast, inclusion of horses and a fun theme will see Snickers near the top of our most liked ads in terms of positive Twitter sentiment.

Analysis

Snickers made Super Bowl history this year by being the first brand to perform and broadcast their commercial live during the event. With the intrigue of a live performance, as well as the inclusion of superstars like Betty White and Adam Driver, we were excited to see how this one played out, particularly the reaction on social media.

Sentiment analysis of Snickers tweets

While we did pretty well predicting the reactions to both the Pepsi and Budweiser ads, we’ll put our hands up here and admit we got this one wrong!

Overall, mentions of Snickers on Twitter were very low. From the tweets we did gather, the vast majority of them had neutral sentiment, meaning viewers really didn’t feel strongly about the ad either way.

Whether they are well received or not, great ads tend to make people feel something. Unfortunately for Snickers, their innovative approach and live broadcast wasn’t enough to make up for an ad that failed to make viewers feel anything, and ultimately it fell flat.

Watch: Snickers LIVE Super Bowl ad

Lady Gaga vs. the brands

We showed earlier the impact that Lady Gaga had on Pepsi’s tweet volumes, but to really drive home the full extent of Twitter’s reaction to the singer during the Super Bowl, we’ve compared total tweet volumes for each of the three brands we’ve looked at in this post and compared them to Lady Gaga’s.

Tweet volumes: Lady Gaga, Pepsi, Budweiser & Snickers

Reaction in online news

Now that we’ve looked at some of the public reaction to Super Bowl 51 on Twitter, we wanted to also look at how at how the news reacted to the event, and in particular the ads battle. To do this, we began by looking at the most mentioned keywords in news stories mentioning “Super Bowl” and “ad” or “commercial”.

Note: We removed obvious, unhelpful and game-related keywords such as Houston, football, Falcons, Tom Brady, etc.

What were the most talked about Super Bowl topics in the news?

The bubble chart below shows the most mentioned topics from online news content in the week immediately following the Super Bowl. The bigger the bubble, the higher the mention count. You can hover over each bubble to view more information and data.

It’s hard to escape politics these days, and the Super Bowl was no exception. With the likes of Budweiser, Airbnb, 84 Lumber, Audi and Coca-Cola all airing ads that related to the current political climate, it is no surprise to see these brands mentioned most alongside political and Donald Trump.

Most mentioned individuals

With brands mostly dominating the previous chart, we decided to narrow our focus on the individuals who were mentioned most. Again, Donald Trump tops the list, followed by Lady Gaga, Melissa McCarthy (KIA ad) and Justin Bieber (T-Mobile ad).

Conclusion

As we touched on in our previous post, the modern-day Super Bowl is becoming increasingly less about the game itself, and more about the surrounding hype, entertainment and commercial opportunities that come with an event of such magnitude.

With top brands spending a minimum of $5 million for a 30 second commercial, what seems like a heavy investment can result in a big increase in brand awareness as viewers promote ads through shares and likes on social media. There is uncapped potential for these ads too. Create something special that connects with, amuses or fascinates viewers and your ad may be viewed and shared for years to come.

Thanks to advancements in Natural Language Process and Text Analysis, brands can analyze ad performance down to the minutest of details and gain powerful insights in their quest to create commercial content that resonates with viewers.





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Introduction

Super Bowl 51 had us on the edge of our seats. A dramatic comeback and a shocking overtime finish meant the 111.3 Million Americans who tuned into the event certainly got what they came for. Even though TV viewership was down on previous years, the emotional rollercoaster that was Sunday’s game will certainly go down as one of the greatest.

As with any major sporting event, the Super Bowl creates an incredible amount of hype, particularly on Social Media. All of the social chatter and media coverage around the Super Bowl means it’s a fantastic case study in analyzing the voice of fans and their reactions to the event. Using advanced Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing techniques, such as Sentiment Analysis, we are able to understand how fans of both the Patriots and the Falcons collectively felt at any given moment throughout the event.

Not familiar with Sentiment Analysis? Sentiment Analysis is used to detect positive or negative polarity in text and can help you understand the split in opinion from almost any body of text, website or document.

Our process

We used the Twitter Streaming API to collect a total of around 2.2 million tweets that mentioned a selection of game and team-related keywords, hashtags and handles. Using the AYLIEN Text Analysis API, we analyzed each of these tweets and visualized our results using Tableau. In particular, we were interested in uncovering and investigating the following key areas:

  • Volume of tweets before, during and after the game
  • Sentiment of tweets before, during and after the game
  • Team-specific fan reactions
  • The most tweeted players
  • The most popular Super Bowl hashtag

Keyword selection

We focused our data collection on keywords, hashtags and handles that were related to Super Bowl 51 and the two competing teams, including;

#SB51, #superbowl, #superbowlLI, #superbowl51, #superbowl2017, #HouSuperBowl, #Patriots, #NEPatriots, #newenglandpatriots, #Falcons, #AtlantaFalcons.

Once we collected all of our tweets, we spent a bit of time cleaning and prepping our data set, first by disregarding some of the metadata which we felt we didn’t need. We kept key indicators like time stamps, tweet ID’s and the raw text of each tweet. We also removed retweets and tweets that contained links. From previous experience, we find that tweets containing links are mostly objective and generally don’t hold any author opinion towards the event.

Tools we used

Visualizations

Like with many of our data-driven blog posts, we used Tableau to visualize our results. All visualizations are interactive and you can hover your mouse over each one to dive deeper into the key data points from which they are generated.

We began our analysis of Super Bowl 51 by looking at the overall volume of tweets in the lead up and during the game.

Tweet volume over time: all tweets

The graph below represents minute-by-minute fluctuations in tweet volumes before during and after the game. For reference, we’ve highlighted some of the key moments throughout the event with the corresponding spikes in tweet volume.

As you can see, there is a definite and steady increase in tweet volume in the period leading up to the game. From kickoff, it is then all about reactions to in-game highlights, as seen by the sharp spikes and dips in volumes. We’ve also highlighted the halftime period to show you the effect that Lady Gaga’s performance had on tweet volumes.

Let’s now take a closer look at the pre-game period and in particular, fan predictions.

Pre-game tweet volume: #PatriotsWin vs. #FalconsWin

For the past 13 years, video game developers EA Sports have been using their football game ‘Madden NFL’ to simulate and predict the winner of the Super Bowl each year. They now have a 10-3 success-failure rate, in case you were wondering! In recent times, they have also been inviting the Twittersphere to show their support for their team by using a certain hashtag in their tweets. For 2017, it was #PatriotsWin vs. #FalconsWin.
So, which set of fans were the most vocal in the 2017 #MyMaddenPrediction battle? We listened to Twitter in the build up to the game for mentions of both hashtags, and here’s what we found;

58.57% of tweets mentioned #FalconsWin while 41.43% went with #PatriotsWin. While the Patriots were firm pre-game favorites, it is likely that the neutral football fan on Twitter got behind the underdog Falcons as they chased their first ever Super Bowl win, in just their second appearance.

Tweet volume over time by team

Now that we’ve seen the overall tweet volume and the pre-game #MyMaddenPrediction volumes, let’s take a look at tweet volumes for each individual team before, during and after the game.
The graph below represents tweet volumes for both teams, with the New England Patriots in the top section and the Atlanta Falcons in the bottom section.

Talk about a game of two halves! That vertical line you can see between the two main peaks represents halftime, and as you can see, Falcons fans were considerably louder in the first half of the game, before the Patriots fans brought the noise in the second half as their team pulled off one of the greatest comebacks in Super Bowl history.

Sentiment analysis of tweets

While tweet volumes relating to either team can be a clear indicator of their on-field dominance during various periods of the game, we like to go a step further and look at the sentiment of these tweets to develop an understanding of how public opinion develops and fluctuates.

The charts below are split into two sections;

Top: Volume of tweets over time, by sentiment (Positive / Negative)

Bottom: Average sentiment polarity over time (Positive / Negative)

New England Patriots

What’s immediately clear from the chart above is that, for the majority of the game, Patriots fans weren’t too happy and it seems had given up hope. However, as you can see by the gradual increase in positive tweets sentiment and volume in the final third, their mood clearly and understandably changes.

Atlanta Falcons

In stark contrast to the Patriots chart, Falcons fans were producing high volumes of positive sentiment for the majority of the game, until the Patriots comeback materialized, and their mood took a turn for the worse, as indicated by the drop of sentiment into negative.

Most tweeted individuals

To get an understanding of who people were talking about in their tweets, we looked at the top mentioned individuals. Unsurprisingly, Tom Brady was heavily featured after his 5th Super Bowl triumph.However, the most mentioned individual had no part to play in the actual game.

All notable players and scorers (and even Brady himself) were shrugged aside when it came to who the viewers were talking about and reacting to most on Twitter, as halftime show performer Lady Gaga dominated. To put the singer’s domination into perspective, she was mentioned in nearly as many tweets as Brady and Ryan were combined!

To get an idea of the scale of her halftime performance, check out this incredible timelapse;


Interestingly, national anthem singer Luke Bryan was tweeted more than both the Patriots’ Head Coach Bill Belichick and catch-of-the-game winner Julian Edelman. Further proof, if needed, that the Super Bowl is not just about the game of football, but that it is becoming more and more of an entertainment spectacle off the field.

Most popular Super Bowl hashtags

We saw a variety hashtags emerge for the Super Bowl this year, so we decided to see which were the most used. Here are the top 5 most popular Super Bowl hashtags, which we have visualized with volumes below;

#SuperBowl

#SB51

#SuperBowl2017

#SuperBowlLI

#SuperBowl51

Despite the NFL’s best efforts to get Twitter using #SB51, the most obvious and simple hashtag of #SuperBowl was a clear winner.

Conclusion

There is no other event on the planet that creates as much hype in the sporting, advertising and entertainment worlds. But the Super Bowl as we know it today, is far less about the football and more about the entertainment factor and commercial opportunity. With big brands spending a minimum $5 Million for a 30 second commercial, competition for viewers eyes and more importantly viewers promotion through shares and likes on social media, the Super Bowl has become big business.

In our next installment, we’ve analyzed the chatter around Super Bowl 51 from a branding point of view. We collected and analyzed Twitter data and news and media coverage of the event to pinpoint which brands and commercials joined the Patriots as Super Bowl 51 champions.





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Introduction

We’re just two days away from seeing the Atlanta Falcons and New England Patriots go head to head at Super Bowl 51 in Texas. With an anticipated viewership of over 100 million people, it’s no surprise that some of the world’s biggest brands are pulling out all the stops in an attempt to win a much anticipated off-field battle. We are of course talking about the annual Super Bowl ads battle, where top brands are willing to cough up over $5 million for just 30 seconds of TV airtime.

Sentiment Analysis of tweets from Super Bowl 2016

Last year, we analyzed 1.8 million tweets during Super Bowl 50 to uncover the best, the worst, and the most controversial ads according to Twitter users. Using advanced Sentiment Analysis techniques, we were able to uncover that Amazon’s star-studded effort was the most popular ad at Super Bowl 50, earning the highest volume of positive tweets. PayPal, on the other hand, found themselves at the opposite end of the positivity scale, receiving the highest volume of negative tweets. And the most controversial? We had a clear winner in that category with Mountain Dew’s Puppy Monkey Baby shocking, confusing and amusing viewers in equal measure!

Of course, it’s not all about those 30 seconds of TV airtime. Brands that create something memorable can reap the rewards long after the final whistle has blown. Popular ads can go viral in minutes, with those that fail to impress being left behind and quickly forgotten. Just take a look at the YouTube views for these three brand ads since Super Bowl 50;

YouTube views since Super Bowl 50

With close to 30 million YouTube hits, it’s safe to say that Mountain Dew did pretty well from their wacky creation last year! For PayPal on the other hand, it was back to the drawing board with an expensive disappointment.

Watch: Mountain Dew’s Super Bowl 50 ad “Puppymonkeybaby”

Note: In this post, which is part 1 of a 3 part series, we’re going to focus on the hype surrounding the ads battle in the lead up to big game. Check back for part 2 and 3 where we’ll dive into the in-game reaction on social media and how the brands fared from the press reaction after the event.

The most anticipated ads of Super Bowl 51

This year, as well as once again analyzing millions of tweets to uncover the good, the bad and the ugly among Super Bowl 51 commercials (check back next week for that one!), we thought it would be cool to find out which brands are receiving the most media attention in the lead up to the event.

Using the AYLIEN News API we sourced and analyzed thousands of news stories that mentioned keywords relating to the Super Bowl and the brands that are advertising throughout. From these stories, and using the power of Natural Language Processing in our Text Analysis engine, we were able to uncover which brands have been mentioned most in news stories in the lead up to the event..

The top 15 most mentioned brands

The bubble chart below represents the 15 brands that have received the most mentions in Super Bowl commercial-related news content since January 1. The bigger the bubble, the higher the mentions volume;

Right away we can see a clear leader in Budweiser, who received 50% more mentions than the second most mentioned brand, Pepsi. Why are Budweiser receiving so much attention? Well, much like Mountain Dew last year, controversy is proving to be a key factor, as we’re about to show you.


Want to track mentions and get intelligent, NLP-driven insights into the world’s news content? Sign-up for a free 14 day trial of our News API and get started!

Our top 3 Super Bowl commercials to watch out for

Having uncovered the top 15 most mentioned brands, we thought we would put our necks on the line by selecting three of these brands that we believe will make the biggest splash on social media during Super Bowl 51.

Budweiser

In an attempt to better understand the reasoning behind the hype around Budweiser, we analyzed all news stories mentioning “Super Bowl” and “Budweiser” to see what other topics were present in the collection of articles. From our results we removed keywords relating to the football game itself, as well as obvious brand-related words such as Bud, Anheuser-Busch, beer, etc. The topics that remained quickly gave us an indication of why this ad is proving to be controversial in the US;

Topics extracted from stories mentioning “Super Bowl” and “Budweiser”

Coincidence, or political statement?

Budweiser’s commercial preview, titled Born The Hard Way, shows Adolphus Busch, the co-founder of Anheuser-Busch, arriving in the US from Germany with the dream of opening his beer brewery. With the immigrant-theme of the commercial and opening line of dialogue being “You don’t look like you’re from around here”, the thoughts of political statement quickly spring to mind.

Watch: Budweiser’s Super Bowl ad preview “Born The Hard Way”

Despite Budweiser vice-president, Ricardo Marques, stating that “There’s really no correlation with anything else that’s happening in the country”, news outlets and social media commentators beg to differ, with a strong split in opinion quickly forming. We’re even seeing the spread of #BoycottBudweiser across many tweets.



Whether intentional or not, Budweiser have placed themselves firmly at the center of an fiery debate on immigration, and it will be fascinating to see the public reaction to their main showpiece on Sunday.

Our Budweiser prediction

  • Most controversial ad this year
  • Ad content will be irrelevant, and a political debate will rage on Twitter

Snickers

Snickers will make Super Bowl history this year by being the first brand to perform and broadcast their commercial live during the event.

While Snickers have released a number of small teaser-style previews with a western-theme, we’re still not sure exactly how this one is going to play out.

Watch: Snickers’ Super Bowl ad teaser

With the intrigue of a live performance, as well as the inclusion of superstars like Betty White and Adam Driver, we’re excited to see how this one goes, particularly the reaction on social media.

Live commercial, live Twitter reaction

The world’s first live Super Bowl commercial presents us with the opportunity to track public reaction before, during and after the performance. While we’ll be tracking and analyzing the reaction to all of our top 15 ads, the uniqueness of Snickers’ live commercial brings a whole new level of insight into the tracking of public opinion. Judging by the teasers, it appears that Snickers are going for a wild west-style performance with horses, celebrities and a number of performers.

The big question is, how will social media respond to a real-time, potentially unpolished and unpredictable live performance? We can’t wait to find out!

Our Snickers prediction

  • Live format will inspire and drive high social engagement.
  • A popular cast, inclusion of horses and a fun theme will see Snickers near the top of our most liked ads in terms of positive Twitter sentiment.


Want to track Twitter reactions yourself? Build your own sentiment analysis tool in just 10 minutes. No coding required, and it’s free 🙂

Pepsi

Our second most mentioned brand, Pepsi are investing heavily in Super Bowl 51 with commercials for two products, as well as sponsoring the 12-minute Halftime Show.

For Pepsi, their main aim is to generate awareness around two new products; LIFEWTR and Pepsi Zero Sugar. Have they been successful in this regard so far? While our post-game analysis will give us a better indication of the overall success of their campaign, we can perhaps already say that these two products are being somewhat overshadowed.

Here are the top keywords from stories mentioning “Super Bowl” and “Pepsi”, excluding game-related and obvious brand-related keywords such as Houston, PepsiCo, football, etc.

Topics extracted from stories mentioning “Super Bowl” and “Pepsi”

If you weren’t aware of who was performing during the Super Bowl Halftime Show, now you are! Lady Gaga is absolutely dominating in terms of media mentions, and Pepsi’s high mention volume is most definitely a result of the singer’s involvement in the Halftime Show that they just happen to be sponsoring.

Perhaps worryingly for Pepsi, we saw no mention of LIFEWTR or Pepsi Zero Sugar in our top 100 keyword results.

Watch: Pepsi Super Bowl 51 ad “Inspiration Drops”

Last year, PayPal were accused of playing it safe when it came to their Super Bowl ad. Have Pepsi made the same mistake with LIFEWTR?

Our Pepsi prediction

  • Huge Twitter mention volumes for Pepsi, owing to Lady Gaga’s performance.
  • Low mention volumes for LIFEWTR and Pepsi Zero Sugar.
  • Tame public reaction to LIFEWTR commercial and very low YouTube views.

Who will be the winners and losers at Super Bowl 51?

We’ll be listening to and analyzing news and social media content before, during and after Super Bowl 51 to bring you our annual insights into public and media reaction to both the game itself and the ads battle, so check back next week to find out who were the biggest winners and losers!

Happy Super Bowl weekend to you all 🙂


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